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CDC looking into possible link between vaccines & myocarditis

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is investigating a possible link between the COVID-19 vaccine and myocarditis—an inflammation of the heart muscle—among a younger age group. 

At this time, the CDC says that there have been “relatively few” reports of myocarditis and that rates have not “differed from expected baseline rates.” Most cases appear to be mild, and the CDC released the following findings regarding the reported cases—occurring following mRNA vaccinations (Pfizer & Moderna). 

  • predominantly in adolescents and young adults,
  • more often in males than females,
  • more often following dose 2 than dose 1, and
  • typically within 4 days after vaccination.

Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, Chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, told ABC News that the investigation is being conducted out of “an abundance of caution” and that “at this point, there is no relationship proven.”

ABC’s report went on to note that the condition usually went away on its own and that the risk of developing myocarditis appears to be around 1 in 5 million. The CDC continues to recommend the vaccine for all eligible age groups which includes those 12 & up for the Pfizer vaccine, 18+ for Moderna and Johnson & Johnson. The agency recently released the findings of its “largest vaccine effectiveness study” in health workers with the mRNA vaccines showing an efficacy rate of 94%.

The Mayo Clinic explains that symptoms of myocarditis can induce chest pain, Rapid or abnormal heart rhythms, shortness of breath, at rest or during physical activity, fluid retention with swelling of your legs, ankles and feet, fatigue, or other signs and symptoms of a viral infection, such as a headache, body aches, joint pain, fever, a sore throat or diarrhea. 

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